[AstroPy] Past Mention of Source Extractor Command in IRAF?

Douglas Tody dtody@nrao....
Tue Apr 28 22:42:19 CDT 2009


Hi -

You might also want to look at ACE, although I do not know the current
status of the package.  See for example the paper by Valdes, 2001:

     http://www.adass.org/adass/proceedings/adass00/P3-01/

There are various other related packages in IRAF as well.

 	- Doug


On Tue, 28 Apr 2009, Rick Wagner wrote:

> Hi,
>
> Out of curiosity (and some background knowledge), I did some hunting
> around on the IRAF site. My original comment was going to be that
> SExtractor [1], is an independent tool, which "builds a catalogue of
> objects from an astronomical image", and is separate from IRAF [2],
> which is designed for image manipulation. And I was going to agree
> with Rose that what you were probably looking for was astrometry.net.
>
> However, what I found on the IRAF site was this entry in the FAQs:
> Is there an ASTROMETRY package I can use?
> http://tinyurl.com/dl7sly
>
> Now, what I think your looking for is the imcoords package in IRAF,
> which includes functions like this [3]:
>
> ccfind: Locate reference catalog objects in images
> ccxymatch: Match celestial and pixel coordinate lists
>
> Hope I'm close, if not, I hope this didn't take up too much of your
> time.
>
> --Rick
>
> [1] SExtractor - http://tinyurl.com/cbhk4r
> [2] IRAF - http://iraf.net
> [3] http://iraf.noao.edu/irafnews/apr98/irafnews.14.html
>>
>
>
>> Just IRAF. Well, I can easily get around this in a paper I'm
>> writing by
>> just saying that IRAF is another tool that does source extraction.
>> BTW,
>> who created IRAF and who supports it?   I found the install pdf.
>> Ah, NOAO.
>>
>> I don't have it installed, since I'm on Win. I did did install Cygwin,
>> but never got around to installing it there. It's not something I need
>> immediately.
>>
>> Rose Finn wrote:
>>> I am not sure if you are referring to astrometry.net, but I think it
>>> does much of what you describe:
>>>
>>> http://astrometry.net/
>>>
>>> Take care,
>>> Rose
>>>
>>> On Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 8:25 PM, Wayne Watson
>>> <sierra_mtnview@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Probably not, but is what you mentioned source extraction? The
>>>> idea is
>>>> that you take a picture of some part of the night sky, and then
>>>> turn it
>>>> over to the source extractor. It twists, rescales, and turns your
>>>> image
>>>> every which way until it matches 10 or more corresponding objects
>>>> (stars, etc.) in a photographic atlas of some sort. If it looks
>>>> right,
>>>> you can then extract information about those objects and maybe
>>>> others.
>>>> It's an astrometric tool.
>>>>
>>>> James Turner wrote:
>>>>
>>>>>> I believe in some of my exchanges on this mailing list in the last
>>>>>> many works someone mentioned an IRAF facility akin to what is
>>>>>> popularly called source extract. Mention was made of what could be
>>>>>> considered a command name that somehow is used in connection
>>>>>> with the
>>>>>> idea. Does anyone know what that single (command) word was or
>>>>>> where I
>>>>>> would find the extractor topic discussed in IRAF?
>>>>>>
>>>>> Is it noao.digiphot.apphot (type "help apphot")?
>>>>>
>>>>> James.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>> --
>>>>           Wayne Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
>>>>
>>>>             (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
>>>>              Obz Site:  39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet
>>>>
>>>>           All the neutrons, and protons in the human body occupy
>>>>           a cube whose side is 5.52*10**-6 meters (tiny!). That
>>>>           adds up to a 150 pound person. It's not a surprise that
>>>>           we are mostly space. (Calculation by WTW)
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> AstroPy mailing list
>>>> AstroPy@scipy.org
>>>> http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/astropy
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>>            Wayne Watson (Watson Adventures, Prop., Nevada City, CA)
>>
>>              (121.015 Deg. W, 39.262 Deg. N) GMT-8 hr std. time)
>>               Obz Site:  39° 15' 7" N, 121° 2' 32" W, 2700 feet
>>
>>            All the neutrons, and protons in the human body occupy
>>            a cube whose side is 5.52*10**-6 meters (tiny!). That
>>            adds up to a 150 pound person. It's not a surprise that
>>            we are mostly space. (Calculation by WTW)
>>
>>
>>
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>> AstroPy mailing list
>> AstroPy@scipy.org
>> http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/astropy
>>
>
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