[IPython-dev] [Anaconda Support] Re: What's the easiest way to open an IPython Notebook server in a particular directory on Windows?

Jason Moore moorepants@gmail....
Mon Feb 24 17:20:01 CST 2014


Thanks for all the great suggestions. I'll try out the `.bat` method as
soon as I get back to a Windows machine.


Jason
moorepants.info
+01 530-601-9791


On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 4:55 PM, Matt Merrifield <
rmatthewmerrifield@gmail.com> wrote:

> Clever! Very simple and useful. I like it!
>
> Personally, I set up .ipynb files to be opened by nbconvert when clicked
> (done with another registry key). So when I double-click on any .ipynb
> file, it generates a fresh .html render that I can e-mail to the rest of my
> team, even the ones who don't use IPython.
>
> The contents of the key to associate nbconvert with .ipynb :
>
> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
>
> [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\.ipynb\shell\nbconvert\command]
> @="C:\\Windows\\system32\\cmd.exe /K ipython nbconvert \"%1\""
>
>
> This one took some trial-and-error to get right -- windows shell scripting
> is not my strong suit -- so somebody may have a better way to do this.
> Regardless, I've found the nbconvert functionality to be really useful.
>
> Perhaps the anaconda team could add a few things to the .ipynb
> file-extension context menu? Ideally the default behavior would be
> something like Ian's solution, to open the notebook. Ideally, it would open
> in the current kernel (to avoid the multitude of command prompt windows). A
> secondary option available through a right-click to run nbconvert on the
> notebook would be really useful too.
>
>
> On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 1:02 PM, Ian Bell <ian.h.bell@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Another even simpler possibility, one I use myself, is to make a batch
>> file called ipython_nb.bat (or whatever you want), with contents "ipython
>> notebook %1" (without the quotes).  Then right click a .ipynb file and set
>> the ipython_nb.bat file as the default file opener for ipynb files.  Works
>> a treat.  You could add other command line parameter as well.  Only mildly
>> negative thing is that you can get quite a few command prompts scattered
>> around from all the servers if you use this method regularly.
>>
>> Ian
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 9:51 PM, Aron Ahmadia <aron@ahmadia.net> wrote:
>>
>>> Awesome!  Both of those are comprehensive solutions to the "not able to
>>> launch IPython in the right folder" problems.  I think the first solution
>>> is actually a good candidate for inclusion in the Software Carpentry
>>> "Configuration Problems and Solutions" wiki page being maintained by Justin
>>> Kitzes over here:
>>> https://github.com/swcarpentry/bc/wiki/Configuration-Problems-and-Solutions
>>>
>>> Feel free to add your solution, and perhaps a link back to this
>>> discussion for how to set up registry keys.  I'd even propose that the
>>> Anaconda developers add a context menu option for launching IPython
>>> Notebooks in Windows based on your advice.
>>>
>>> Cheers,
>>> Aron
>>>
>>>
>>> On Mon, Feb 24, 2014 at 3:04 PM, Matt Merrifield <
>>> rmatthewmerrifield@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>> I had this exact problem. I found two solutions that I liked:
>>>>
>>>> Batch Files
>>>> -----------
>>>>
>>>> Use batch file scripts! A batch file is, after all, just a terminal
>>>> command that you run by double clicking it. My co-workers liked this
>>>> method a lot better than opening a new command prompt, navigating to where
>>>> they wanted to work, and then running the ipython notebook command.
>>>>
>>>> To make a batch file script that opens an ipython notebook in whatever
>>>> directory it's run from:
>>>>
>>>> 1. Create a simple .txt file: Right Click -> New ->  Text Document
>>>> 2. Re-name it "Start IPython Notebook Here.bat" (don't forget to change
>>>> the extension!)
>>>> 3. Open it with notepad: Right Click on it -> Edit
>>>> 4. Add the text "ipython notebook" to the file -- it should look just
>>>> like you would type it in a command prompt.
>>>> 5. Save & close.
>>>>
>>>> Now when you double click on the .bat file, a notebook server will
>>>> spawn in that directory. You can move the .bat file to wherever you want
>>>> your IPython notebook's working directory to be. You can make copies of the
>>>> .bat file, and stash one in all the directories you frequently use. You can
>>>> give a copy of the file to people that you're training, and they can just
>>>> double-click and go. No need to teach them the command prompt.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Registry Keys
>>>> -------------
>>>>
>>>> I work with the IPython notebooks daily in different directories all
>>>> over my filesystem, so I got tired of copying the .bat script to every
>>>> directory I worked in. I added an option to start a notebook in a directory
>>>> to my right-click context menu by adding a few registry keys.
>>>>
>>>> This option is good for anyone who uses IPython frequently, doesn't
>>>> mind an extra option in their right-click menu, and is comfortable editing
>>>> their windows registry.
>>>>
>>>> You should be able to create a text document, copy in the text above,
>>>> change the extension to .reg, and then run it(just once) to add the context
>>>> menu entry. Put the following 5 lines in the file:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
>>>>
>>>> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Directory\Background\shell\ipynb]
>>>> @="Open IPython Notebook"
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Classes\Directory\Background\shell\ipynb\command]
>>>> @="C:\\Windows\\system32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe
>>>> ipython notebook"
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Once the registry key has been added, whenever you right-click in a
>>>> folder (or on your desktop) you'll have the option to "Open IPython
>>>> Notebook". Selecting that option will spawn a powershell instance, and call
>>>> "ipython notebook" as if you'd typed it on the command line -- just like
>>>> the batch file method, but without the extra file in the directory.
>>>>
>>>> Note: if you ever want to remove the registry keys, you'll have to open
>>>> up regedit.exe and delete them manually. Some users might become frustrated
>>>> with the extra option if they rarely use the notebook, and they might have
>>>> trouble getting rid of it, so I wouldn't offer this option unless you know
>>>> they will use it all the time.
>>>>
>>>> Another Note: Neither of these methods starts the notebook with the
>>>> "--pylab inline" flag. You can get similar functionality with the "%pylab"
>>>> or "%matplotlib inline" magics.
>>>>
>>>> Let me know if you have any questions. I'll do what I can to answer.
>>>>
>>>> -Matt
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> On Sun, Feb 23, 2014 at 3:09 PM, Jason Moore <moorepants@gmail.com>wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> Thanks, I already have asked the Anaconda mailing list too. Just
>>>>> haven't gotten a response yet.
>>>>>
>>>>> Maybe I should just include the Windows shortcut in the directory full
>>>>> of notebooks. That would work.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> Jason
>>>>> moorepants.info
>>>>> +01 530-601-9791
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>> On Sun, Feb 23, 2014 at 6:06 PM, Aron Ahmadia <aron@ahmadia.net>wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>> It might be better to direct this question to the Anaconda mailing
>>>>>> list (cc'd).
>>>>>>
>>>>>> You could distribute a shortcut for them that does the right thing
>>>>>> when you're packaging your repository.  If you come up with something
>>>>>> better or that works for you, please add it to the Software Carpentry
>>>>>> "configuration problems" Wiki
>>>>>> https://github.com/swcarpentry/bc/wiki/Configuration-Problems-and-Solutions
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Right now Software Carpentry instructors usually get around this by
>>>>>> teaching the command line *before* Git :)
>>>>>>
>>>>>> A
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>  On Sun, Feb 23, 2014 at 6:00 PM, Jason Moore <moorepants@gmail.com>wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>  The IPython Notebook shortcut installed by Anaconda defaults to
>>>>>>> opening in the "IPython Notebooks" directory. Is there an easier (point and
>>>>>>> click?) method to opening the server in another directory besides (1) open
>>>>>>> a CMD prompt and cd'ing to the directory or (2) changing the "start in"
>>>>>>> properties of the shortcut?
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> I'm giving a tutorial to command line novices and was hoping for
>>>>>>> something very simple for them to open up the notebook server in the
>>>>>>> correct directory.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> Jason
>>>>>>> moorepants.info
>>>>>>> +01 530-601-9791
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>>>>> IPython-dev mailing list
>>>>>>> IPython-dev@scipy.org
>>>>>>> http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-dev
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>
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>>>>>
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