Ok - thanks for the information.  I&#39;ll use that when I get around to it.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Wed, Mar 11, 2009 at 3:35 AM, Ville M. Vainio <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:vivainio@gmail.com">vivainio@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;"><div class="im">On Tue, Mar 10, 2009 at 11:28 PM, Rocky Bernstein &lt;<a href="mailto:rocky@gnu.org">rocky@gnu.org</a>&gt; wrote:<br>

<br>
&gt; Here&#39;s an additional thought along that vein. The way pydbgr gets its<br>
&gt; commands for the command-line command processor is to import all files in a<br>
&gt; directory, introspect and look for classes that end in &quot;Command&quot; and<br>
&gt; instantiate each of those. (Now that I write this, better might be to check<br>
&gt; that they are instances of some Command superclass) .  Given this, it&#39;s<br>
&gt; possible to add a feature where users can write their own customized<br>
&gt; debugging commands and put them in a directory and when you start the<br>
&gt; debugger point to the directory and have the debugger add those additional<br>
&gt; debugger commands.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; I throw this idea out as an alternative to ipython way to add &quot;magic&quot;<br>
&gt; commands. I&#39;m not that familiar with ipython magic commands, but probably<br>
&gt; that&#39;s the way one would add debugger-specific commands in ipython.<br>
<br>
</div>You can add magics programmatically through<br>
_ip.expose_magic(&quot;mymagic&quot;, callable). So these schemes are not<br>
mutually exclusive.<br>
<font color="#888888"><br>
--<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">Ville M. Vainio<br>
<a href="http://tinyurl.com/vainio" target="_blank">http://tinyurl.com/vainio</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>