<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 12:57 PM, Ondrej Certik <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ondrej@certik.cz">ondrej@certik.cz</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="im">On Tue, Aug 4, 2009 at 1:45 PM, Fernando Perez&lt;<a href="http://fperez.net" target="_blank">fperez.net</a>@<a href="http://gmail.com" target="_blank">gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; Howdy,<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; not that I&#39;m advocating any changes *now*, but this might be worth<br>
&gt; looking into.  I think nose and py.test share some ancestry, and it<br>
&gt; seems that py.test is maturing nicely.  I especially like the<br>
&gt; &#39;funcargs&#39; way of writing parametric tests without &#39;yield&#39;: I use<br>
&gt; parametric tests *a lot*, but they are extremely hard to debug when<br>
&gt; they break, because of how nose runs them.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Just a note for the scratchpad :)<br>
<br>
</div>Py.test is way better imho, if nothing, just the nice error reporting.<br>
I will have a look if I can contribute the green [OK] results, I just<br>
can&#39;t live without it. Otherwise I think it&#39;s pretty good.<br>
<font color="#888888"></font></blockquote><div><br>In what other ways is it better?  The error reporting of nose is horrible though, that is for sure.<br><br>Cheers,<br><br>Brian<br><br> <br></div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<font color="#888888"><br>
<br>
Ondrej<br>
</font><div><div></div><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
IPython-dev mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:IPython-dev@scipy.org">IPython-dev@scipy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-dev" target="_blank">http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-dev</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>