hi fernando, matthew and brian,<br><br>thanks for putting this together. i&#39;m really looking forward to (ipython, nipy) being on github.<br><br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); padding-left: 1ex;">

# Get your fork:<br>
git clone git@github.com:ellisonbg/ipython.git<br>
<br>
# Create a feature branch<br>
git branch foo<br>
git checkout foo<br>
<br>
# edit files, # for each file do:<br>
git add [filename]<br>
git commit<br>
# rinse and repeate<br>
<br>
# To post branch to github<br>
git push origin foo<br></blockquote><div><br>talking of a cheat-sheet, there are a few other commands that i tend to use:<br><br># to pull collaborators updates from github<br>git pull origin foo (if you are working with somebody on your branch)<br>
<br># deleting<br>
git branch -d foo (delete your local merged branch)<br>git branch -D foo (delete your local unmerged branch)<br>
git push origin :foo (delete remote branch - this took me a search to figure out when i started)<br><br>also for my needs this has been very helpful:<br><a href="http://github.com/guides/git-cheat-sheet">http://github.com/guides/git-cheat-sheet</a><br>
<br>users will always do all kinds of wacky things that you cannot foresee, so you should keep it simple, perhaps just reflect your basic workflow as brian suggests.<br><br>------------<br># Get your copy<br>git clone git@github.com:ellisonbg/ipython.git<br>
<br># update your copy (run this to sync up with the source)<br>
git pull<br><br>#####<br># if you are a user, that&#39;s all you need to know. if you <br># want to hack/develop, read on.<br>#####<br><br># ... the rest of brian&#39;s notes above, gitwash docs<br>------------<br><br>i&#39;m about to give a talk about minimizing redundancy for data and code and i believe it applies to documentation as well!<br>
<br>cheers,<br><br>satra<br></div></div>