<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 17 December 2012 20:00, Brian Granger <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ellisonbg@gmail.com" target="_blank">ellisonbg@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>

<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex"><div id=":28c">* How do we manage communication?  Verbal communication is much more<br>
efficient than emails or even IRC.  The 4 people at Berkeley will have<br>
an incredible advantage in being able to talk daily.  We don&#39;t want to<br>
cripple or remove that advantage, but we need to figure out how to<br>
include other core devs and people from the community.  This is<br>
particularly relevant to myself as I am the only person involved in<br>
the Sloan work that is not at Berkeley.</div></blockquote></div><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">I think this issue - communication - is becoming key. I spent a day away from my computer, and came back to &gt;40 new e-mails in my IPython folder (in addition to the 20 odd unread that I&#39;m planning to get round to one day). That&#39;s a mixture of our two mailing lists and the Github notification messages. I get the feeling we&#39;re approaching a critical point, where it&#39;s no longer possible for us as individuals to keep up with all the discussions going on.<br>

<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">To my mind, we need to split things up. We already have an informal separation of interests - for instance, I leave most of the discussion about the notebook front-end to others, but get more involved with IPython.core. I think we need to make this a bit (not too much) more formal, so that no-one falls down the cracks as everything speeds up.<br>

<br></div><div class="gmail_extra">This could mean, e.g. more specialised mailing lists, or having a consistent process for handling incoming issues.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_extra">Best wishes,<br>Thomas<br></div>
<div class="gmail_extra">
<br><br></div></div>