<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On Tue, Jan 15, 2013 at 1:58 PM, Brian Granger <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:ellisonbg@gmail.com" target="_blank">ellisonbg@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">One point: while some of our scope and feature creep problems can be<br>
solved by good workflows and tools, others can&#39;t.  I don&#39;t think we<br>
need tools to better manage more and more new features, we need tools<br>
to help us better manage fewer new features *well*.  And maybe that is<br>
another way of putting it: I am arguing for quality, not quantity of<br>
features.<br></blockquote>This is a very good point, but since i&#39;m on a kick: what is the means for determining quality? For the kernel? For 
the notebook? For the various frontends? Does every committer weigh in on every 
decision? What is the role of non-committers? &quot;Plebiscite&quot; style decision making would probably be crippling. If a project can start 
determining what these heuristics are, maybe the data from its various feeds can help.<br><br></div><div class="gmail_quote">I liked some of the discussion on your blog post (I think) by the SymPy guys: their users &quot;only use 20%&quot; of SymPy... but every user has a different 20%! What is the broader community&#39;s usage of IPython like? Has this been captured before?<br>
</div></div></div>