Putting this back on the list because I think it&#39;s valuable discussion of UI.<br><br>Aside: the way the lists work means we must keep hitting &#39;reply all&#39; (at least in GMail), which isn&#39;t the case with other mailing lists. Is this something we can change?<br>

<br><div class="gmail_quote">On 28 January 2012 01:36, Harald Schilly <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:harald.schilly@gmail.com">harald.schilly@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

&gt; I wonder: if a user&#39;s first language is written right-to-left, when they are<br><div class="im">
&gt; writing code left-to-right, will it feel more natural to have [output &lt;-<br>
&gt; code] or [code -&gt; output].<br>
<br>
</div> also, consider the difference between left-and-right handed people.<br></blockquote><div><br>Does that make a difference to how you perceive information on screen? Clearly it&#39;s relevant to mouse and keyboard interactions, but I don&#39;t think left handedness means that your perception is somehow the other way round. Left handed English-speakers are still used to reading left-to-right.<br>

</div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex;border-left:1px solid rgb(204,204,204);padding-left:1ex">

For me, code on the right makes more sense. The reasons is that my<br>
eyes would have to move less far when switching around. Imagine, you<br>
are looking at the picture, at average your eyes are in the middle -<br>
now start reading the code. You have to start at the left of the line,<br>
and that&#39;s closer when the code is on the right hand side of the<br>
image.<br></blockquote><div><br>That&#39;s an interesting point, although I&#39;m sceptical that the small extra distance would make any practical difference. I suspect it takes an order of magnitude more time to find the relevant point within the code.<br>

</div>Thomas<br></div><br>