<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=windows-1252"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <br>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:CAOvn4qh=NBcAozJ7pj23YNwgN_YU5fuZadCgYG9p+J=ZYPJU1g@mail.gmail.com"
      type="cite">
      <div class="gmail_quote">
        <blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0
          .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
          that would make it even possible to drag the split line
          around. I<br>
          don't know how hard it would be to do that, but I think it's a<br>
          feasible idea to try to implement this …</blockquote>
      </div>
      <br>
      This sounds like a more tractable approach than redirecting the
      plots to another notebook. It would also mean that the plots were
      kept together with the code that produced them, so you could
      scroll both parts together.<br>
      <br>
    </blockquote>
    I have the feeling that while this might sound easier, it might also
    kill the whole point of the idea: what if the output is longer than
    the input <br>
    <br>
    x = linspace(0, 10, 100)<br>
    plot(sin(x))<br>
    <br>
    will create a figure which is bound to be bigger than these two
    lines. Now, will the two boxes (input/output) have the same height?
    If so, then we are back to square one, for the code will "move" on
    the screen. One way out of this could be to use frames, so that the
    boxes could be scrolled, but in my opinion, frames are quite ugly,
    besides, if the frame on the right hand side (output/plot) is as
    tall as the one for the code, then one would have to scroll the
    figure to see it. That does not sound right. <br>
    <br>
    The problem about separating the code and the output (I think,
    Thomas brought this up later in the discussion) is not a serious
    one, I believe: if you need them in the same notebook, then you
    simply re-run the code notebook with this separation option switched
    off. By the way, is it possible to execute all input cells in a
    notebook with a single keystroke?<br>
    <br>
    For these reasons, I would be in favour of a solution that could
    completely detach the output from the input. I might very well be
    wrong, but as far I remember, Fernando showed something similar in
    his presentation that he also linked in the notebook tour: he was
    typing in one notebook, and the variables appeared in the other one.
    <br>
    <br>
    This might be a very naive idea, but couldn't this be handled by
    silencing the output on one side (this is probably the easy part),
    and then have another notebook on the other side, and that notebook
    would just listen to the same kernel, and whenever a printable
    output or plot is created, it would display it. <br>
    <br>
    Cheers,<br>
    Zoltán<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>