<div class="gmail_quote">2012/1/28 Harald Schilly <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:harald.schilly@gmail.com">harald.schilly@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div id=":1c1">I think the reason why code<br>
is on the right is that it is flipped in your brain and the general<br>
idea is that the left hemisphere is more &quot;logical&quot;. I don&#39;t think that<br>
this is of any significance, but worth considering. (and the more<br>
art-oriented right hemisphere will be happy to have drawings on the<br>
left).</div></blockquote></div><br>I think the notion of predominantly &#39;logical&#39; and &#39;creative&#39; hemispheres is now considered a major oversimplification at best. It&#39;s the kind of neat &#39;fact&#39; that seems plausible enough to get repeated without anyone checking it, and can provide a science-y justification for fairly arbitrary decisions. In any case, we focus both eyes on the point we&#39;re paying attention to, so I doubt the layout makes any significant difference to where information ends up in the brain. <br>

<br>The idea of placing plots and output on the right was more that cause follows effect, and the languages we&#39;re most familiar with are read left to right. Of course, it would make sense to have an option to switch it round.<br>

<br>I wonder: if a user&#39;s first language is written right-to-left, when they are writing code left-to-right, will it feel more natural to have [output &lt;- code] or [code -&gt; output]. I&#39;m trying to imagine writing code right-to-left, and I think it would still be clearer to me for the layout to follow my first language&#39;s writing system. Would any Arabic or Hebrew speakers on the list like to chip in?<br>

<br>Thomas<br>