<html><head></head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style>On Jun 8, 2012, at 6:37 PM, MinRK &lt;<a href="mailto:benjaminrk@gmail.com">benjaminrk@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span></div><div><br></div>
<div></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Fri, Jun 8, 2012 at 5:53 PM, Fernando Perez <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:fperez.net@gmail.com" target="_blank">fperez.net@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<div class="im">On Fri, Jun 8, 2012 at 2:54 PM, Jon Olav Vik &lt;<a href="mailto:jonovik@gmail.com">jonovik@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt; Incidentally, I discovered that I can execute the ipengine code directly<br>
&gt;&gt; in my python IDE and set break points in my user code modules and when I<br>
&gt;&gt; execute functions from remote clients/views, it will hit the break<br>
&gt;&gt; points and let me debug my code visually (in the running engine). Pretty<br>
&gt;&gt; sweet. Though I&#39;d share.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Brilliant! This works in Eclipse PyDev on Windows too. What I did:<br>
<br>
</div>We really need a tips and tricks section in the wiki...<br>
<br>
Min, do you want to kick on a thread off the conversation we had about<br>
the wiki?  I&#39;m happy to revisit that, I&#39;m just not sure we have the<br>
bandwidth for one more conversation quite now ;)<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>I think we can discuss that at another time, when we aren&#39;t gearing up for SciPy tutorials and trying to draw the lines around a 0.13 release.</div>


<div><br></div><div>But the gist: Every day I find my dislike of mediawiki and rst growing, and I think for high visibility / low barrier for edits, a GitHub wiki might be an improvement, at least for FAQ / tips&amp;tricks / links type stuff.</div>


<div><br></div><div>-MinRK</div></div></div></blockquote><div><br></div>We moved our SymPy wiki from MediaWiki/Google Code to GitHub a while ago, and I would recommend it. Markdown is the best markup language IMHO (and it also supports rst for more complex documents). Also, the ability to edit the files with your text editor and manage them with git is a huge plus. <div>
<br></div><div>Some heads up: merging the wikis is a task. Gollum&#39;s MediaWiki parser isn&#39;t really good. You&#39;ll likely want to convert them to Markdown or rst. We&#39;ve only gotten our pages converted through a lot of volunteer work, and we still have some very old pages that still have formatting problems. If you are regular expression savvy this is where the ability to edit the files locally will come in handy, but it can be tricky, especially with images. There&#39;s also the question of getting the files out of MediaWiki, but I&#39;m sure there are scripts to do that. Getting old pages to redirect is probably possible but also probably difficult (unless someone has also already made a nice solution for that too). We never made the effort to do it. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Second, Gollum is a tad buggy, especially when it comes to non-Markdown formats as I mentioned. But it is open source and their development team seems friendly enough. </div><div><br></div><div>Finally, you&#39;ll note that it&#39;s a step down from MediaWiki in terms of features. It doesn&#39;t even attempt to do merges, for example, and doesn&#39;t have a live preview functionality (yet). It&#39;s best to edit files locally and let git do the merging in my experience. </div>
<div><br></div><div>But the pluses are that it&#39;s all local and with git, meaning you have the whole wiki including history backed up to every clone, as well as the other powerful features of git like merging and diffs  And it&#39;s very easy for anyone with a GitHub account to edit it with the web interface(caveat: if they want to add an image, they have to do it through git, so they either have to have repo push access or fork the wiki and get someone with repo access to merge it, or just get them to upload the file for them.  You cannot grant push access to the wiki without also granting it to the repo that it sits on). </div>
<div><br></div><div>If you are considering it, I might recommend turning the wiki on (if it isn&#39;t already; I don&#39;t have Internet now as I&#39;m writing this, so I can&#39;t check) and test it, and you&#39;ll soon discover if if you think it&#39;s worth the switch.  The downside of this is the confusion that comes from having two wikis (but hey, at one point SymPy had three wikis). </div>
<div><br></div><div>But yeah, turning on the GitHub wiki is something you can do now, but migrating the old one is definitely something that you&#39;ll want to wait until you have the bandwidth and/or volunteers for. </div>
<div><br></div><div>Aaron Meurer</div><div><br><div><br><blockquote type="cite"><div><div class="gmail_quote"><div> </div><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">

<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br>
f<br>
</font></span><div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5">_______________________________________________<br>
IPython-User mailing list<br>
<a href="mailto:IPython-User@scipy.org">IPython-User@scipy.org</a><br>
<a href="http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user" target="_blank">http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user</a><br>
</div></div></blockquote></div><br>
</div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>IPython-User mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:IPython-User@scipy.org">IPython-User@scipy.org</a></span><br>
<span><a href="http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user">http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user</a></span><br></div></blockquote></div></div></body></html>