<html><head></head><body bgcolor="#FFFFFF"><div>If the variable name is a fairly unique one, you could do a find and replace in the JSON itself using a text editor. I think there might also be a way to export the notebook to a .py file and reimport it, in which case you can use any Python refactoring tool under the sun (others will have to say how to do this or correct me if I&#39;m wrong here). <br>
<br>Aaron Meurer</div><div><br>On Jul 14, 2012, at 10:55 AM, &quot;<a href="mailto:junkshops@gmail.com">junkshops@gmail.com</a>&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:junkshops@gmail.com">junkshops@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br></div>
<div></div><blockquote type="cite"><div><p>The fact that the ipynb saves all your variables in memory is great, but it makes refactoring a little more tricky since you have to remember to delete your old function/variable names. Otherwise, if you miss changing a name somewhere it can lead to hard to fix bugs since the old variable/function still exists but is invisible to the user. </p>


<p>How do people deal with this other than being extremely careful when refactoring? I&#39;ve taken to restarting the kernel after I make extensive changes to make sure I haven&#39;t forgotten to delete any variables, but I assume some of the more experienced users have better methods. I&#39;d definitely be interested in suggestions.</p>


<p>Cheers, Gavin</p>
</div></blockquote><blockquote type="cite"><div><span>_______________________________________________</span><br><span>IPython-User mailing list</span><br><span><a href="mailto:IPython-User@scipy.org">IPython-User@scipy.org</a></span><br>
<span><a href="http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user">http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user</a></span><br></div></blockquote></body></html>