<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Hi Michael.<div><br></div><div><br></div><div>First, I suggest you use `subplots` with s , which return both the figure and the axes of each subplot.</div><div>And is a little more convenient than subplot. You could learn more with `subplots?`</div><div>You can then show the current sate of the figure at anytime with display(figure)</div><div><br></div><div>f , ax = subplots()</div><div>ax.plot(…)</div><div>display(f)</div><div>ax.plot(…)</div><div>display(f)</div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div>Or returning `f` at the end of you cell which will display it as output of the cell.</div><div>As you are writing a tutorial, just keep in mind that there is a slight difference between ending a cell with `display(f)` or `f`</div><div>as the first only display and the second return the figure.</div><div><br></div><div>Of course you can do the same with subplot (without s) as long as you use figure() and assign it to f before plotting.</div><div><br></div><div>`display` function &nbsp;is specific to IPython, but difference between figures and axes are more a matplotlib issues in which i'm not an expert.&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>We would be happy to see what are the use people make of the notebooks, so don't hesitate to share yours.</div><div>May I suggest you to have a look at nbconvert one of IPython organization repo on github[1], and also&nbsp;</div><div>nbviewer[2] that might be useful for you , also Fernando did write a little blog post on how to embed notebook static view on blogs.[3]&nbsp;</div><div><br></div><div>Cheers,&nbsp;</div><div>--&nbsp;</div><div>Matthias</div><div><br></div><div>[1]&nbsp;<a href="https://github.com/ipython/nbconvert">https://github.com/ipython/nbconvert</a>&nbsp;</div><div>[2]&nbsp;<a href="http://nbviewer.ipython.org/">http://nbviewer.ipython.org/</a></div><div>[3]&nbsp;<a href="http://blog.fperez.org/2012/09/blogging-with-ipython-notebook.html">http://blog.fperez.org/2012/09/blogging-with-ipython-notebook.html</a></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><br></div><div><div><div>Le 15 sept. 2012 à 09:17, Michael Waskom a écrit :</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite">Hi,<div><br></div><div>I'm working on converting some tutorials over from MATLAB into the Notebook. In these tutorials, frequently there will be some code to generate a plot, commentary on the plot, and then several small changes and replots (e.g. adding things in steps, changing the view in 3D plots, etc.)</div>

<div><br></div><div>Is there a way (using the matplotlib object-oriented&nbsp;interface) to replot an axis object in a subsequent cell, thus avoiding rewriting all of the common plotting code? &nbsp;In other words something like:</div>

<div><br></div><div>In [12]: ax = subplot(111); &nbsp;ax.plot(foo);</div><div><br></div><div>In [13]: replot(ax); ax.plot(bar)</div><div><br></div><div>Obviously in this toy example it doesn't save much, but for more complicated plots it could make things much more clean.</div>

<div><br></div><div>Thanks!</div><div>Michael</div>
_______________________________________________<br>IPython-User mailing list<br><a href="mailto:IPython-User@scipy.org">IPython-User@scipy.org</a><br>http://mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/ipython-user<br></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>