On 6 November 2012 13:10, Thomas Kluyver <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:takowl@gmail.com" target="_blank">takowl@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
<div class="im"><div class="gmail_quote">On 6 November 2012 12:58, John Burkhart <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:jfburkhart.reg@gmail.com" target="_blank">jfburkhart.reg@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">


I think the problem may be related to the version of Visual Studio I am using to build python.NET. For the test case, I used VS2008Express. However, in production, I have to use VS2012 and target the .NET 4 assemblies.</blockquote>


</div><br></div>Python 2.7 is built with VS2008, and I know the versions of MSVCRT correspond to VS versions. So I think you&#39;ve found the problem. I&#39;m not sure what you can do about it, though. Hopefully some of our Windows users will be able to help you.<br>
<span class="HOEnZb"><font color="#888888"><br></font></span></blockquote><div>You have indeed found the issue. Python extensions must be built with the same C compiler as Python itself. If you have to use VS2012 for your extension, I think you&#39;ll be forced to build your own Python as well.</div>
<div><br></div><div>You may be able to find a way round this, but that&#39;s the &quot;official&quot; advice, I believe, and CRT interoperability is not something I know enough about to go against the advice of the experts.</div>
</div><br><div>Paul</div>