[Numpy-discussion] Time for beta1 of NumPy 1.0

Robert Kern robert.kern at gmail.com
Sat Jul 1 14:36:20 CDT 2006


Travis Oliphant wrote:
> Charles R Harris wrote:
>> Thanks Travis,
>>
>> Your directions are very helpful and much appreciated.
> I placed these instructions at
> 
> http://projects.scipy.org/scipy/numpy/wiki/MakingBranches
> 
> Please make any changes needed to that wiki page.

I will add (here as well as the wiki) that using the svnmerge tool to be 
enormously helpful in maintaining branches.

   http://www.dellroad.org/svnmerge/index

Among other things, it makes merge commit messages with the contents of the 
individual commit messages, so history isn't lost when changes are merged back 
into the trunk.

Here is how I tend to set things up for bidirectional merging:

(untested with this specific example, though)

   $ cd ~/svn/scipy
   $ svn cp http://svn.scipy.org/svn/scipy/trunk 
http://svn.scipy.org/svn/scipy/branches/mine
   $ svnmerge init http://svn.scipy.org/svn/scipy/branches/mine
   $ svn commit -F svnmerge-commit-message.txt
   $ svn switch http://svn.scipy.org/svn/scipy/branches/mine
   $ svnmerge init http://svn.scipy.org/svn/scipy/trunk
   $ svn commit -F svnmerge-commit-message.txt

Then, when you need to pull in changes from the trunk, view them with

   $ svnmerge avail

and pull them in with

   $ svnmerge merge
   $ svn ci -F svnmerge-commit-message.txt

When you're finally done with the branch, the same procedure on the trunk pulls 
in all of the (real, not merged in from the trunk) changes you've made to the 
branch.

Also, if you're only going to be making changes in one directory, I've found 
that it's much easier to simply branch that directory and svn switch just that 
directory over. That way, you don't have to worry about pulling in everyone 
else's changes to the rest of the package into the branch. You can just svn up.

-- 
Robert Kern

"I have come to believe that the whole world is an enigma, a harmless enigma
  that is made terrible by our own mad attempt to interpret it as though it had
  an underlying truth."
   -- Umberto Eco





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