<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Feb 8, 2008 8:58 AM, Francesc Altet &lt;<a href="mailto:faltet@carabos.com">faltet@carabos.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
A Friday 08 February 2008, Charles R Harris escrigué:<br><div class="Ih2E3d">&gt; &gt; Also, in the context of my work in indexing, and because of the<br>&gt; &gt; slowness of the current implementation in NumPy, I&#39;ve ended with an<br>
&gt; &gt; implementation of the quicksort method for 1-D array strings. &nbsp;For<br>&gt; &gt; moderately large arrays, it is about 2.5x-3x faster than the<br>&gt; &gt; (supposedly) mergesort version in NumPy, not only due to the<br>
&gt; &gt; quicksort, but also because I&#39;ve implemented a couple of macros for<br>&gt; &gt; efficient string swapping and copy. &nbsp;If this is of interest for<br>&gt; &gt; NumPy developers, tell me and I will provide the code.<br>
&gt;<br>&gt; I have some code for this too and was going to merge it. Send yours<br>&gt; along and I&#39;ll get to it this weekend.<br><br></div>Ok, great. &nbsp;I&#39;m attaching it. &nbsp;Tell me if you need some clarification on<br>
<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c">the code.<br></div></div></blockquote><div><br>I ran a few timing tests. On my machine strncmp is about 100x faster than opt_strncmp, but&nbsp; sSWAP (with some fixes), is about 10x faster then using the memcpy in a recent compiler. Does this match with your experience.<br>
<br>Chuck <br></div><br></div><br>