<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 6:38 PM, Robert Kern &lt;<a href="mailto:robert.kern@gmail.com">robert.kern@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">On Thu, Apr 10, 2008 at 7:31 PM, Charles R Harris<br>
&lt;<a href="mailto:charlesr.harris@gmail.com">charlesr.harris@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt; &gt; That said, str(float_numpy_scalar) really should have the same rules<br>
&gt; &gt; as str(some_python_float).<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; For all different precisions?<br>
<br>
</div>No. I should have said str(float64_numpy_scalar). I am content to<br>
leave the other types alone.<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
&gt; And what should the rules be.<br>
<br>
</div>All Python does is use a lower decimal precision for __str__ than __repr__.<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
&gt; I note that<br>
&gt; numpy doesn&#39;t distinguish between repr and str, maybe we could specify<br>
&gt; different behavior for the two.<br>
<br>
</div>Yes, precisely.<br>
<div><div></div><div class="Wj3C7c"></div></div></blockquote><div><br>Well, I know where to do that and have a ticket for it. What I would also like to do is use float.h for setting the repr precision, but I am not sure I can count on its presence as it only became part of the spec in 1999. Then again, that&#39;s almost ten years ago. Anyway,&nbsp; python on my machine generates 12 significant digits. Is that common to everyone?<br>
<br>Chuck<br></div></div><br>