<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, May 19, 2008 at 2:53 PM, Christopher Barker &lt;<a href="mailto:Chris.Barker@noaa.gov">Chris.Barker@noaa.gov</a>&gt; wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
<div class="Ih2E3d">Anne Archibald wrote:<br>
&gt; 2008/5/19 James Snyder &lt;<a href="mailto:jbsnyder@gmail.com">jbsnyder@gmail.com</a>&gt;:<br>
</div><div class="Ih2E3d">&gt;&gt; I can provide the rest of the code if needed, but it&#39;s basically just<br>
&gt;&gt; filling some vectors with random and empty data and initializing a few<br>
&gt;&gt; things.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; It would kind of help, since it would make it clearer what&#39;s a scalar<br>
&gt; and what&#39;s an array, and what the dimensions of the various arrays<br>
&gt; are.<br>
<br>
</div>It would also help if you provided a complete example (as little code as<br>
possible), so we could try out and time our ideas before suggesting them.<br>
<div class="Ih2E3d"><br>
&gt;&gt; np.random.standard_normal(size=(1,self.naff))<br>
<br>
</div>Anyone know how fast this is compared to Matlab? That could be the<br>
difference right there.<br>
</blockquote><div><br>The latest versions of Matlab use the ziggurat method to generate random normals and it is faster than the method used in numpy. I have ziggurat code at hand, but IIRC, Robert doesn&#39;t trust the method ;) I don&#39;t know if it would actually speed things up, though.<br>
<br>Chuck<br></div><br></div><br>