<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Sun, Feb 12, 2012 at 1:26 PM, Andrea Gavana <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:andrea.gavana@gmail.com">andrea.gavana@gmail.com</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Charles,<br>
<div><div class="h5"><br>
On 12 February 2012 21:00, Charles R Harris wrote:<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; On Fri, Feb 10, 2012 at 9:38 AM, Andrea Gavana &lt;<a href="mailto:andrea.gavana@gmail.com">andrea.gavana@gmail.com</a>&gt;<br>
&gt; wrote:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Hi All,<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt;    my apologies for my deep ignorance about math stuff; I guess I<br>
&gt;&gt; should be able to find this out but I keep getting impossible results.<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;&gt; Basically I have a set of x, y data (around 1,000 elements each) and I<br>
&gt;&gt; want to create 2 parallel &quot;curves&quot; (offset curves) to the original<br>
&gt;&gt; one; &quot;parallel&quot; means curves which are displaced from the base curve<br>
&gt;&gt; by a constant offset, either positive or negative, in the direction of<br>
&gt;&gt; the curve&#39;s normal. Something like this:<br>
&gt;&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt; Note that curves produced in this way aren&#39;t actually &#39;parallel&#39; and can<br>
&gt; even cross themselves.<br>
<br>
</div></div>I know, my definition of &quot;parallel&quot; was probably not orthodox enough.<br>
What I am looking for is to generate 2 curves that look &quot;graphically<br>
parallel enough&quot; to the original one, and not &quot;parallel&quot; in the true<br>
mathematical sense.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br>You could try setting a point and &#39;contracting&#39; the curve towards the point. A point a infinity would give the usual parallel curves. There are probably a lot of perspective like transformations that would do something similar.<br>
<br>Chuck <br></div></div>