<br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Feb 20, 2012 at 9:55 AM, Sturla Molden <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:sturla@molden.no">sturla@molden.no</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">
Den 20.02.2012 17:42, skrev Sturla Molden:<br>
<div class="im">&gt; There are still other options than C or C++ that are worth considering.<br>
&gt; One would be to write NumPy in Python. E.g. we could use LLVM as a<br>
&gt; JIT-compiler and produce the performance critical code we need on the fly.<br>
&gt;<br>
&gt;<br>
<br>
</div>LLVM and its C/C++ frontend Clang are BSD licenced. It compiles faster<br>
than GCC and often produces better machine code. They can therefore be<br>
used inside an array library. It would give a faster NumPy, and we could<br>
keep most of it in Python.<br>
<div class="HOEnZb"><div class="h5"><br></div></div></blockquote><div><br>Would that work for Ruby also? One of the advantages of C++ is that the code doesn&#39;t need to be refactored to start with, just modified step by step going into the future. I think PyPy is close to what you are talking about.<br>
<br>Chuck<br></div><br></div>