[Numpy-svn] r8584 - branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib

numpy-svn@scip... numpy-svn@scip...
Sun Aug 1 06:21:57 CDT 2010


Author: rgommers
Date: 2010-08-01 06:21:57 -0500 (Sun, 01 Aug 2010)
New Revision: 8584

Modified:
   branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/scimath.py
   branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/shape_base.py
   branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/stride_tricks.py
   branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/twodim_base.py
Log:
DOC: wiki merge, twodim_base and a few loose ones.

Modified: branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/scimath.py
===================================================================
--- branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/scimath.py	2010-08-01 11:21:38 UTC (rev 8583)
+++ branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/scimath.py	2010-08-01 11:21:57 UTC (rev 8584)
@@ -3,16 +3,17 @@
 whose output data-type is different than the input data-type in certain
 domains of the input.
 
-For example, for functions like log() with branch cuts, the versions in this
-module provide the mathematically valid answers in the complex plane:
+For example, for functions like `log` with branch cuts, the versions in this
+module provide the mathematically valid answers in the complex plane::
 
->>> import math
->>> from numpy.lib import scimath
->>> scimath.log(-math.exp(1)) == (1+1j*math.pi)
-True
+  >>> import math
+  >>> from numpy.lib import scimath
+  >>> scimath.log(-math.exp(1)) == (1+1j*math.pi)
+  True
 
-Similarly, sqrt(), other base logarithms, power() and trig functions are
+Similarly, `sqrt`, other base logarithms, `power` and trig functions are
 correctly handled.  See their respective docstrings for specific examples.
+
 """
 
 __all__ = ['sqrt', 'log', 'log2', 'logn','log10', 'power', 'arccos',

Modified: branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/shape_base.py
===================================================================
--- branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/shape_base.py	2010-08-01 11:21:38 UTC (rev 8583)
+++ branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/shape_base.py	2010-08-01 11:21:57 UTC (rev 8584)
@@ -126,27 +126,26 @@
 
     `func` is called as `res = func(a, axis)`, where `axis` is the first
     element of `axes`.  The result `res` of the function call must have
-    either the same dimensions as `a` or one less dimension. If `res` has one
-    less dimension than `a`, a dimension is inserted before `axis`.
-    The call to `func` is then repeated for each axis in  `axes`,
+    either the same dimensions as `a` or one less dimension.  If `res`
+    has one less dimension than `a`, a dimension is inserted before
+    `axis`.  The call to `func` is then repeated for each axis in `axes`,
     with `res` as the first argument.
 
     Parameters
     ----------
     func : function
         This function must take two arguments, `func(a, axis)`.
-    a : ndarray
+    a : array_like
         Input array.
     axes : array_like
-        Axes over which `func` is applied, the elements must be
-        integers.
+        Axes over which `func` is applied; the elements must be integers.
 
     Returns
     -------
     val : ndarray
-        The output array. The number of dimensions is the same as `a`, but
-        the shape can be different. This depends on whether `func` changes
-        the shape of its output with respect to its input.
+        The output array.  The number of dimensions is the same as `a`,
+        but the shape can be different.  This depends on whether `func`
+        changes the shape of its output with respect to its input.
 
     See Also
     --------

Modified: branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/stride_tricks.py
===================================================================
--- branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/stride_tricks.py	2010-08-01 11:21:38 UTC (rev 8583)
+++ branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/stride_tricks.py	2010-08-01 11:21:57 UTC (rev 8584)
@@ -33,16 +33,16 @@
 
     Parameters
     ----------
-    `*args` : arrays
+    `*args` : array_likes
         The arrays to broadcast.
 
     Returns
     -------
     broadcasted : list of arrays
-        These arrays are views on the original arrays. They are typically not
-        contiguous. Furthermore, more than one element of a broadcasted array
-        may refer to a single memory location. If you need to write to the
-        arrays, make copies first.
+        These arrays are views on the original arrays.  They are typically
+        not contiguous.  Furthermore, more than one element of a
+        broadcasted array may refer to a single memory location.  If you
+        need to write to the arrays, make copies first.
 
     Examples
     --------

Modified: branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/twodim_base.py
===================================================================
--- branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/twodim_base.py	2010-08-01 11:21:38 UTC (rev 8583)
+++ branches/1.5.x/numpy/lib/twodim_base.py	2010-08-01 11:21:57 UTC (rev 8584)
@@ -172,20 +172,22 @@
     M : int, optional
       Number of columns in the output. If None, defaults to `N`.
     k : int, optional
-      Index of the diagonal: 0 refers to the main diagonal, a positive value
-      refers to an upper diagonal, and a negative value to a lower diagonal.
-    dtype : dtype, optional
+      Index of the diagonal: 0 (the default) refers to the main diagonal,
+      a positive value refers to an upper diagonal, and a negative value
+      to a lower diagonal.
+    dtype : data-type, optional
       Data-type of the returned array.
 
     Returns
     -------
-    I : ndarray (N,M)
+    I : ndarray of shape (N,M)
       An array where all elements are equal to zero, except for the `k`-th
       diagonal, whose values are equal to one.
 
     See Also
     --------
-    diag : Return a diagonal 2-D array using a 1-D array specified by the user.
+    identity : (almost) equivalent function
+    diag : diagonal 2-D array from a 1-D array specified by the user.
 
     Examples
     --------
@@ -294,7 +296,9 @@
         Input data, which is flattened and set as the `k`-th
         diagonal of the output.
     k : int, optional
-        Diagonal to set.  The default is 0.
+        Diagonal to set; 0, the default, corresponds to the "main" diagonal,
+        a positive (negative) `k` giving the number of the diagonal above
+        (below) the main.
 
     Returns
     -------
@@ -303,7 +307,7 @@
 
     See Also
     --------
-    diag : Matlab workalike for 1-D and 2-D arrays.
+    diag : MATLAB work-alike for 1-D and 2-D arrays.
     diagonal : Return specified diagonals.
     trace : Sum along diagonals.
 
@@ -342,7 +346,7 @@
 
 def tri(N, M=None, k=0, dtype=float):
     """
-    Construct an array filled with ones at and below the given diagonal.
+    An array with ones at and below the given diagonal and zeros elsewhere.
 
     Parameters
     ----------
@@ -352,7 +356,7 @@
         Number of columns in the array.
         By default, `M` is taken equal to `N`.
     k : int, optional
-        The sub-diagonal below which the array is filled.
+        The sub-diagonal at and below which the array is filled.
         `k` = 0 is the main diagonal, while `k` < 0 is below it,
         and `k` > 0 is above.  The default is 0.
     dtype : dtype, optional
@@ -360,9 +364,9 @@
 
     Returns
     -------
-    T : (N,M) ndarray
-        Array with a lower triangle filled with ones, in other words
-        ``T[i,j] == 1`` for ``i <= j + k``.
+    T : ndarray of shape (N, M)
+        Array with its lower triangle filled with ones and zero elsewhere;
+        in other words ``T[i,j] == 1`` for ``i <= j + k``, 0 otherwise.
 
     Examples
     --------
@@ -391,9 +395,9 @@
     ----------
     m : array_like, shape (M, N)
         Input array.
-    k : int
-        Diagonal above which to zero elements.
-        `k = 0` is the main diagonal, `k < 0` is below it and `k > 0` is above.
+    k : int, optional
+        Diagonal above which to zero elements.  `k = 0` (the default) is the
+        main diagonal, `k < 0` is below it and `k > 0` is above.
 
     Returns
     -------
@@ -402,7 +406,7 @@
 
     See Also
     --------
-    triu
+    triu : same thing, only for the upper triangle
 
     Examples
     --------
@@ -421,13 +425,14 @@
     """
     Upper triangle of an array.
 
-    Construct a copy of a matrix with elements below the k-th diagonal zeroed.
+    Return a copy of a matrix with the elements below the `k`-th diagonal
+    zeroed.
 
-    Please refer to the documentation for `tril`.
+    Please refer to the documentation for `tril` for further details.
 
     See Also
     --------
-    tril
+    tril : lower triangle of an array
 
     Examples
     --------
@@ -448,17 +453,17 @@
     Generate a Van der Monde matrix.
 
     The columns of the output matrix are decreasing powers of the input
-    vector.  Specifically, the i-th output column is the input vector to
-    the power of ``N - i - 1``. Such a matrix with a geometric progression
-    in each row is named Van Der Monde, or Vandermonde matrix, from
-    Alexandre-Theophile Vandermonde.
+    vector.  Specifically, the `i`-th output column is the input vector
+    raised element-wise to the power of ``N - i - 1``.  Such a matrix with
+    a geometric progression in each row is named for Alexandre-Theophile
+    Vandermonde.
 
     Parameters
     ----------
     x : array_like
         1-D input array.
     N : int, optional
-        Order of (number of columns in) the output. If `N` is not specified,
+        Order of (number of columns in) the output.  If `N` is not specified,
         a square array is returned (``N = len(x)``).
 
     Returns
@@ -467,11 +472,6 @@
         Van der Monde matrix of order `N`.  The first column is ``x^(N-1)``,
         the second ``x^(N-2)`` and so forth.
 
-    References
-    ----------
-    .. [1] Wikipedia, "Vandermonde matrix",
-           http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vandermonde_matrix
-
     Examples
     --------
     >>> x = np.array([1, 2, 3, 5])
@@ -586,10 +586,12 @@
 
     We can now use the Matplotlib to visualize this 2-dimensional histogram:
 
-    >>> extent = [xedges[0], xedges[-1], yedges[0], yedges[-1]]
+    >>> extent = [yedges[0], yedges[-1], xedges[-1], xedges[0]]
     >>> import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
-    >>> plt.imshow(H, extent=extent)
+    >>> plt.imshow(H, extent=extent, interpolation='nearest')
     <matplotlib.image.AxesImage object at ...>
+    >>> plt.colorbar()
+    <matplotlib.colorbar.Colorbar instance at ...>
     >>> plt.show()
 
     """



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