[SciPy-dev] attacking import failure from scipy source tree

Pearu Peterson pearu at cens.ioc.ee
Tue Oct 8 08:49:19 CDT 2002


On Tue, 8 Oct 2002, Steve M. Robbins wrote:

> On Tue, Oct 08, 2002 at 01:11:57PM +0300, Pearu Peterson wrote:
> > 
> > On Mon, 7 Oct 2002, Skip Montanaro wrote:
> > 
> > > 
> > >     Travis> It sounds like you may be trying to import scipy from a python
> > >     Travis> session started in your build directory.  Try switching to
> > >     Travis> another dir (like ~/ or /) and begin the python session and try
> > >     Travis> an import.  I won't tell you how many times I have to force
> > >     Travis> myself to remember this each week.
> > > 
> > > I get bitten by this occasionally as well.  It's mildly irksome that I need
> > > to install scipy to test it.  Has anyone debugged this problem?
> > 
> > Yes, I have also thought about this since I started to use scipy.
> > 
> > Possible solutions:
> > 
> > 1) If all scipy modules (at least those modules that contain extension
> > modules) would be in some subdirectory, say lib or src, of scipy source
> > tree, then the problem would be solved. But this would require extensive
> > file moving in scipy CVS repository. I am not sure if scipy CVS server can
> > handle this; limited disk space could be one obstacle.
> 
> If source tree reorganization proves infeasible, could you fake it
> using a script to create appropriate symlinks before running the
> tests?

My initial guess would be no because Windows does not have symlinks.
But is this completely true considering cygwin and mingw? And what about
Mac and symlinks?

Anyway, using symlinks sounds like a quick and dirty solution compared to
already available solutions that are based on playing with distutils
command line flags. Though, it seems that people hardly use them.

Pearu




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