[SciPy-Dev] Required Python Version

Joshua Holbrook josh.holbrook@gmail....
Sat Jul 17 13:51:16 CDT 2010


On Sat, Jul 17, 2010 at 10:32 AM, Benjamin Root <ben.root@ou.edu> wrote:
> FWIW, NOAA has recently (within the past year, I believe) gotten approval to
> *upgrade* to RHEL5.  And because of IT policies, or because they need to run
> programs on servers out of their control, many of the users can not
> personally update their version of Python away from 2.4.
>
> I am sure there are other government agencies that are in the same boat.
>
> Ben Root
>
>
>
> On Sat, Jul 17, 2010 at 9:13 AM, Nathaniel Smith <njs@pobox.com> wrote:
>>
>> On Sat, Jul 17, 2010 at 5:25 AM, Ralf Gommers
>> <ralf.gommers@googlemail.com> wrote:
>> > On Sat, Jul 17, 2010 at 8:06 PM, David Cournapeau <cournape@gmail.com>
>> > wrote:
>> >> Yes, a lot of "enterprise ready"  distributions still use python 2.4
>> >> (RHEL, Centos).
>> >>
>> > That's not a convincing argument for an infinite amount of time. People
>> > who
>> > value "enterprise ready" meaning they run ancient stuff should be
>> > perfectly
>> > fine with numpy 1.4 + scipy 0.8 for a long time from now. And otherwise
>> > they
>> > can upgrade python itself quite easily. 2.4 doesn't even get security
>> > updates anymore.
>>
>> Your argument makes sense to me (and this decision doesn't affect me
>> either way), but it isn't actually an infinite amount of time --
>> RHEL6, which ships python 2.6, is coming out in a matter of months.
>>
>> Someone should probably poll the -users list in any case -- people
>> running from SVN are not necessarily a representative sample of the
>> user base :-)
>>
>> -- Nathaniel
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>
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I was just using some incredistale government computers yesterday, and
they were running python 2.5. I'd support dropping 2.4, especially if
scipy is going to start supporting even more python versions. In
addition, users requiring 2.4 support can use older versions of numpy,
scipy, etc. As long as these versions are made available, I think
everything would be okay.

--Josh


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