[SciPy-User] butterworth filter on .WAV file

Fabrice Silva silva@lma.cnrs-mrs...
Thu Jul 8 08:21:20 CDT 2010


Le jeudi 08 juillet 2010 à 13:00 +0100, Peter Howard a écrit :
> Hang on a minute - my brain is working backwards... am I wasting
> everyone's time here...
> 
> If a .WAV file contains stereo sound data - then it's never going to
> work sucking it in and simply applying a filter to the numbers is it?
> 
> So how come it sort of works?
> 
> Or is the entire NumPy/SciPy suite so clever about working in
> N-dimensions that it treats the two sound channels as
> multi-dimensioned arrays right from the .WAV read() call? - and the
> filtering is separate for each dimension?
> 
So you might consider NumPy/SciPy clever! When reading a wav file, the
output array is a 2D array with shape (M,N) where M is the number of
samples of each channel (time range*sampling frequency) and N is the
number of channels. Each channel is stored in a column of the output
array.

And it is so clever that it handles to apply a filter (with
scipy.signal.lfilter) on each of the columns of the array.

Example
In [2]: import scipy.io.wavfile as wv

In [3]: Fs,Sig = wv.read("STE-023.wav")
Warning:  %s chunk not understood
Reading fmt chunk
Reading data chunk

In [4]: Fs
Out[4]: 44100

In [5]: Sig.shape, Sig.dtype
Out[5]: ((4434112, 2), dtype('int16'))

In [6]: import scipy.signal as ss

In [8]: SigFilt = ss.lfilter([1],[1, .1], Sig)
Out[8]: 
array([[  0. ,   0. ],
       [  4. ,  -9.4],
       [  7. , -20.7],
       ..., 
       [  0. ,   0. ],
       [  0. ,   0. ],
       [  0. ,   0. ]])

In [9]: SigFilt.shape, SigFilt.dtype
Out[9]: ((4434112, 2), dtype('float64'))





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